Dr. Joe McMeniman, Ag Econ Questions, National American Society of Animal Science, Pre-Conditioning Calves, Top Tips for Mid-Summer Pre-Conditioning, Australian Issues

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 Dr. Joe McMeniman – Meat & Livestock Australia Feedlot Project Manager

2:30 Ag Economic Questions

7:30 National American Society of Animal Science Meeting

11:45 Pre-Conditioning Calves

17:00 Top 5 Tips for Mid-Summer Pre-Conditioning

18:45 Australian Issues

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Hy-Plains Feedyard with Paula

Written by: Patti Dollarhide

Paula Ghazarian

“Paula, do you want to go on a road trip?”

“Sure, where to?  We made great memories when we traveled to the nutrition conference in Miami on the beach a few years back.  When and where?”

“June 20, 2019 at Hy-Plains Education & Research Center, Montezuma, KS.  Be sure to wear close-toed shoes.”

And that is all it took to get my friend Paula Ghazarian, RN, leader of the Infection Control oversight team at one of the largest hospitals in Kansas for many years, to attend the “Appropriate Antimicrobial & Use & Stewardship” conference several hundred miles away.  She is a life-long learner who pursues learning no matter what the time or setting.  Paula was raised in West Virginia and has stories about raccoons, squirrels and prized coon dogs that make you laugh so hard your stomach hurts, but we soon found that cattle chat was a foreign language to her.  The cattle talk took us to other health-related topics.  I could feel some common ground as she shared her frustration with parents who choose not to vaccinate their children, resulting in outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases.  This easily translates to the cattle business as our customers want us to stop using antibiotics to treat food animals.

We arrived at the Hy-Plains feedlot a little early, and Tom Jones took time to give Paula a tour of the cattle processing area.  Her morning started off with amazement.  “I had no idea it would be so calm, quiet and clean.  I was expecting chaos and very bad odor.”

Paula asked a few questions that were easy to answer, as well as some that don’t really have answers.  She was disappointed that a retailer she held in high esteem due to their stand against antibiotics in chickens has created a trade-off that includes a negative effect on animal welfare.  Increasing animal mortality is not the outcome she wants.

As the day went on, speakers discussed opportunities in our business to reduce stressors that drive how we currently use medically important antibiotics   Modern beef production is a highly specialized business in which technology has allowed farmers to produce more food for a growing world and still stay in business – a cattleman’s ultimate definition of sustainability.

Two different times during the day, questions came from the agriculture audience wondering what the human medical community is doing to address appropriate use and stewardship.   We know, and they know, that there are opportunities.  Paula shared multiple examples on our return trip of how practices and procedures have changed, such as simple oversight in the ICU to remove Foley catheters after three days which had an immediate impact on infection reduction.   She also shared case studies that her specialized infectious disease team worked with that would break your heart.

One Health recognizes that the health of people is connected to the health of animals and the environment.  Research and industry collaboration are essential.  I was proud to have my friend see and hear the efforts that are going on in the agriculture community to make change so she will trust our food supply and want to continue to eat beef

My hope for future meetings is to include more human health professionals in our discussions.  Let’s hear what initiatives they are working on and address antimicrobial use together.

Thru the eye of an infection control nurse not familiar with USA Beef production:

  1. How do the animals get out of this chute?  How do you get them back to the pen?
  2. Why do you track “days on feet”?  Aren’t they always on their feet? 
  3. What are “check off dollars”?
  4. I have never heard of ionophores in human medicine.  What are they? 
  5. There is a lot to know about.
  6. How to the producers at the farmer’s market fit into this model?
  7. There are trade-offs. 
  8. I never thought about how we grind different animals together to make hamburgers.
  9. Antibiotic resistance is everyone’s problem.  We have a lot of examples of changes we have made in human medicine, as well as a lot of challenges this group might be interested in.

Pink Eye, County Fair, Top Tips for Going to the County Fair, Transition Plans, Heat Stress

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

4:20 Pink Eye

10:10 County Fair

13:45 Top 9 Tips for Going to the County Fair

16:00 Transition Plans

25:25 Heat Stress

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Hy-Plains Conference, Listener Question, Top Tips for New Producers, Invasive Species, Top Traits for Beef Cows, Transition Plan Poll

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:30 Hy-Plains Feedyard Conference

9:45 Listen Question: New Cattle Producers

13:25 Top 10 Tips for New Beef Producers

16:15 Invasive Species

20:10 Top Traits for Beef Cows

25:30 Transition Plan Poll Question

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Dr. Ellis, HR Risk, Transition/Estate Plans, Top 5 Areas of Risk & How to Manage, Crisis Communication, Communication Strategies, Fall Brown Calves & Weaning Tips

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 Dr. Ellis, Ag Communications Department Head

4:12 HR Risk

11:24 Transition/Estate Plans

12:58 Top 5 Areas of Risk & How to Manage

14:35 Crisis Communication

18:30 Communication Strategies

21:20 Fall Born Calves & Weaning Tips

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Keep/Cull Poll Question, Livestock Risk Protection, Dr. Larson’s Tanzania Trip, Ag Econ Questions, Institutional Risk, Young Calf Health, Top 5 Health Concerns with Pre-Weaned Calves, Soil Spores, Foot Rot

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 Keep/Cull Poll Question

2:20 Livestock Risk Production

3:40 Dr. Larson’s Tanzania Trip

6:40 Ag Economics Questions

11:00 Institutional Risk

14:45 Young Calf Health

17:30 Top 5 Health Concerns with Pre-Weaned Calves

18:45 Soil Spores

22:20 Foot Rot

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Dr. Dodd, Breeding Season To-do, Moving Calving Season, 7 Tips to Consider when Moving Calving Season, Financial Risk

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:50 Dr. Dodd and Senior Veterinary Students

9:05 Breeding Season To-do

14:35 Moving Calving Season

19:48 7 Tips to Consider when Moving Calving Season

22:00 Financial Risk

26:40 Announcements

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Ag Economics Question, Listener Question, Top 9 Tips for Bringing in Replacements to Manage Health Risks, Production Risk, What to do with a Cow that has Lost a Calf and Kansas Mesonet Cattle Comfort Index

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

3:38 Agricultural Economics Questions

6:20 Listener Question

12:30 Top 9 Tips for Bringing in Replacements to Manage Health Risks

15:00 Production Risk

20:52 What to do with a Cow that has Lost a Calf

27:00 Kansas Mesonet Cattle Comfort Index

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Face and Horn Flies, Risk Management, What to Do After Turning Bulls Out

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:38 – Face and Horn Flies

12:03 – Risk Management

21:10 – What to Do After Turning Bulls Out

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Veterinary Training Program for Rural Kansas Scholars, Cow/Calf Profitability, Kansas Extension Master Food Volunteers, In the News

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:15 – Veterinary Training Program for Rural Kansas Scholars

5:28 – Cow/Calf Profitability

9:05 – Kansas Extension Master Food Volunteers

13:58 – In the News

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Kansas Farm Management Association Report, Thin Cows at Breeding Time, Dealing with Injured Forage Base, Interview with Patti Dollarhide, Ear Tagging, Top 6 Things to Know About Anaplasmosis, Upcoming Events

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:45 – Kansas Farm Management Association Report

9:40 – Thin Cows at Breeding Time

13:05 – Dealing with Injured Forage Base

16:50 – Patti Dollarhide’s Trip to US Roundtable

21:00 – Listener Question – Ear Tagging

24:40 – Top 6 things to Know about Anaplasmosis

  • You can transfer Anaplasmosis Mechanically
  • Biological Vectors
  • Need a VFD to feed tetracycline
  • Anaplasmosis is a Long-term Infection
  • Identify sick cows early
  • Handle sick cows gently

26:32 – Upcoming Events

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Guest Introduction, Spring Lameness in Cattle, Top 5 Tips for Managing Feet and Legs in Bulls, Working Spring Calves, Should I Implant my Cows?

Welcome to Episode 54 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with Senior in Veterinary Medicine, Ellie Minnix!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:42 – Introduction of Ellie Minnix

6:25 – Spring Lameness in Cattle

13:05 – Top 5 Tips for Managing Feet and Legs in Bulls

  • It’s a bigger problem than you realize
  • Not everything is foot-rot
  • Check them through breeding season
  • Evaluate genetic components
  • Evaluate well before the breeding season

15:00 – Working Spring Calves – Do we have to use the same injection site?

18:15 – Should I Implant My Cows?

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Top 10 Ways to Improve Grilling this Season, Introduction of Special Guest Sharla Huseman – Kansas Beef Council, Common Questions for Sharla, Ag Census Facts, Kansas Beef Council and BCI Collaborate on Events , Actions to Take as a Producer

Welcome to Episode 53 of BCI Cattle Chat which is sponsored by the Kansas Beef Council! Our special guest on this episode is Sharla Huseman, Director of Marketing for the Kansas Beef Council. Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

3:10 – BCI CattleChat Checklist – Top 10 Ways to Improve This Year’s Grilling Season

  • Wireless Thermometers
  • Choose Grilling Cuts – For Information on Correct Meat Cuts, visit https://www.kansasbeef.org/
  • Know Your Seasonings
  • Try New Things
  • Share With Others
  • Plan Time Appropriately
  • Be Patient with Charcoal
  • Let Meat Rest
  • Embrace the Process
  • Match Cooking Device

6:05 – Introduction of Sharla Huseman – Director of Marketing for the Kansas Beef Council

10:30 – Common Questions for Sharla

12:49 – Facts from Ag Census

18:55 – Kansas Beef Council and BCI Collaborate on Events

26:35 – What Actions Can I Take to Make a Difference as a Producer?

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Special Episode – Quiz Bowl with K-State Animal Science Champion Quadrathlon Team Vs. BCI CattleChat Podcast Team

Welcome to BCI CattleChat! If you enjoy testing your knowledge on animal health, listen to this episode to hear a special quiz bowl hosting the K-State Animal Science Champion Quadrathlon Team Vs. the BCI CattleChat Podcast Team. There are questions from all categories, try to answer the questions before the buzzer goes off and see which team will win it all!

A huge thank you to the ASI Champion Quadrathlon Team for participating in this fun episode. The Champion team consists of; Derek Neal, Senior in Animal Science, Kyndall Norris, Junior in Animal Science, Amanda Roth, Senior in Animal Science, Mark Jameson, Senior in Animal Science and Karol Fike, Professor in Animal Science.

Questions from Ag Census, Pre-Season Bull Training, Top 6 Things to do for Pre-Season Bull Management, Grass Tetany

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

5:00 – Questions from Ag Census

9:42 – Pre-season Bull TrainingExtension

18:29 – Top 6 Things to do for Pre-Season Bull Management

  • Acclamate Bulls
  • Check Feet and Legs
  • Parasite Control
  • Preventative Health
  • Body Condition
  • Breeding Soundness Exam

19:42 – Grass Tetany

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Travels of the Podcast Team, Top Strengths of the U.S. Industry, AI Synchronization in Heifers, Stage 2 & 3 Labor

Welcome to Episode 50 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:35 – Travels of the Podcast Team

10:20 – Top 9 Strengths of the U.S. Industry

  • Extension
  • Veterinary Training and Diagnostic Labs
  • Productivity and Land Fertility
  • Efficiency and Knowledge
  • Investment in Research
  • Infrastructure Investment (Roads, Railroads, Rivers, Etc.)
  • Education
  • Data Availability
  • People and Producers in Agriculture

13:18 – AI Synchronization in Heifers

18:54 – Stage 2 & 3 Labor

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Guest Tony Batterham, Herd Expansion, Colostrum Management, Top 5 Tips for Managing Colostrum in Beef Herds, Antimicrobial Use in Feed yards, Animal Activism

Welcome to Episode 49 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with Tony Batterham, DVM and Feed yard Consultant of Australia.  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:58 – Introduction of Tony Batterham – DVM, Feed yard Consultant and Board Member of ALFA (Australian Lot Feeders’ Association)

5:26 – Herd Expansion

8:12 – Colostrum Management

14:51 – Top 5 Tips for Managing Colostrum in Beef Herds

  • Manage Body Condition Score
  • Suitable Calving Environment
  • Calving Difficulty Management
  • Feed Colostrum to those with Dystocia
  • Have a Well Vaccinated Cow Herd

16:12 – Antimicrobial Use in Feed yards

20:15 – Animal Activism

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Travels of Podcast Team, Is AI Worth It?, Top 10 Tips for a Successful AI Synchronization Program, Cull Cows, In the News

Welcome to Episode 48 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

:49 – Travels of the Podcast Team

8:39 – Is AI Worth It?

16:48 – Top 10 Tips for a Successful AI Synchronization Program

  • You don’t have to synchronize all cows
  • Have cycling cows
  • Use only high accuracy Bulls
  • Make sure heifers are heavy enough to breed, and cows have a good BCS
  • Make sure the cows you are going to synchronize are far enough from calving season post-partum
  • Use a synchronization protocol that fits your management
  • Make sure facilities are adequate
  • Double check your protocol
  • Have equipment and supplies on hand
  • Have a strategy to identify early calving cows

18:40 – Cull Cows

23:02 – In the News

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Calving Records, Interview with Justin Waggoner – Beef Systems Specialist

Welcome to Episode 47 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with Justin Waggoner, Beef Systems Specialist in Garden City, Kansas. Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:38 – Calving Records

4:05 – Interview with Justin Waggoner – Beef Systems Specialist

Please see below for the supplementation diagram mentioned in the podcast.

Source: Mathis CP, Sawyer JE. Nutritional management of grazing beef cows. Vet Clin N Amer 23:1-19, 2007.

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Using the Pregnancy Analytics Mobile App: Bull problems and BSEs

The Beef Cattle Institute’s Dr. Bob Larson brings you a series of “cases” employing the use of the Pregnancy Analytics mobile app. Each case will explore a unique herd and examine its reproductive efficiency, strengths, challenges and areas of improvement. The reports (linked below) will lead you through using the Pregnancy Analytics app to utilize the data and practice using it on an actual problem herd.

The case: Bull problems and BSEs

A herd of 209 commercial red-composite cows was palpated on October 7. The herd is split into three breeding pastures with bulls being turned out on June 10 and removed on August 15. The calves were being weaned on the ranch (i.e. left in their current pastures) and the cows were being trucked to a new pasture so the owner started dropping off cows at your clinic very early in the morning to be preg-checked, dewormed, and vaccinated before being taken to fall grazing on corn stalks. During the breeding season: 62 were in the “West Pasture” with two bulls, 81 were in the “North Pasture” with three bulls, and 66 were in the “Windmill Pasture” with two bulls. About 60% of the first-calf heifers were in the West Pasture –– with the rest split between the other two pastures.

Findings

Seventy-six cows were open (64% were pregnant) and only 8% of the cows were classified as being “thin” (BCS <5).

The first analysis of the preg-check data was to look at the percent of the herd that became pregnant each 21-day period of the breeding season and we find that 44.5% of the herd became pregnant in the first 21-days (pregnancies would have been 98 to 119 days), 13.9% in the second 21-day period (77-97 days), and 5.3% in the third 21-day period (56-76 days). The goal for this herd (and most herds) is to have at least 60% of the cows becoming pregnant in the first 21 days of breeding.

Another way to evaluate preg-check data is to determine the percent of the available (non-pregnant) cattle that become pregnant each 21-day period. Recognize that as the breeding season goes along, once cattle become pregnant, they are no longer available to get pregnant again, so the percent of the herd that becomes pregnant each 21 days is not the same as the percent of available cattle that become pregnant each 21 days. To display this measure of reproductive success using the Pregnancy Analytics App – select “% Preg Success”. Based on expected pregnancy success when both cow and bull fertility is optimum, the “% Preg Success” goal should be between 60%-70% for every 21-day period of the breeding season.

Looking at the percentage of open cows that became pregnant each 21-day period, we find that either cow or bull fertility (or both) was lower than desired at the start of the breeding season (44.5% settling in first 21 days) and pregnancy success did not improve and in fact got worse as the breeding season progressed (25% in the second 21 days and 12.6% in the third 21 days).

In this herd, the poor over-all percentage pregnant clearly indicates a problem and the percent pregnant by 21-day interval provides information that the poor reproductive performance continued for the entire breeding season. To begin to evaluate the herd further, the Pregnancy Analytics App provides a way to easily divide the herd into pertinent sub-groups – and when the pregnancy success by 21-days is evaluated by age group, we find that both the first-calf heifers and the mature cows had too many open cows. (1st-calf heifers are defined as those cows suckling their first calf and being bred for their second pregnancy).

More information can be found by displaying the % Preg Success and while neither the 1st-calf heifers nor the cows reached the expected reproductive performance of 60-70% of open cows becoming pregnant in a 21-day period –– the 1st calf heifers tended to perform better than cows and the performance declined over the breeding season.

The preg-check data can also be evaluated by comparing the breed-up differences between body condition score categories. We know that only 8% of the herd was classified as “thin” at the time of preg-check, so we may be justified to ignore any assessment of the association between BCS and pregnancy distribution in this herd; but to be complete, I looked at BCS and found that cows classified as being in moderate body condition performed as poorly as cows classified as being thin.

So far, the information I have looked at raises the possibility of either Trichomoniasis or bull problems being the most likely rule-outs – with cow infertility due to nutritional or late-calving being less likely because the magnitude of open cows is more compatible with bull problems or Trich and the fact that fertility does not improve as the cows have more time post-partum to resume fertile cycles as the breeding season progresses.

The most revealing information about this herd is obtained by looking at the effect of breeding pasture on reproductive performance (both the pregnancy distribution and % Preg Success).

I interpret this information as evidence that the primary problem for this herd is in the Windmill pasture. The other two pastures (West and North) perform very well early in the breeding season – indicating that the cows must have had time post-partum and adequate nutrition pre- and post-partum to resume fertile cycles by the 21st day of the breeding season. Nearly all the open cows were in the Windmill pasture and fertility was very poor throughout the breeding season. The magnitude of the infertility is worse than I would expect for Trichomoniasis and definitely worse than I would expect with a cow problem (in addition, excellent cow performance in the other pastures pretty much rules out a cow problem). The poor reproductive performance in the Windmill pasture must be due to a bull problem.

Conclusion

The primary problem in this herd is in the Windmill pasture and almost has to be due to a bull problem even though the rancher reports that all the bulls were between three and five years of age and had been successful breeders in previous years. I would recommend a BSE on both bulls from this pasture, but if one or both bulls pass the BSE, my diagnosis would not change (finding a musculoskeletal or semen problem in one or both bulls would confirm the diagnosis).

To prevent this problem in the future, I would strongly recommend a BSE for all bulls before the start of breeding and frequent assessment of bull musculoskeletal health and amount of estrus activity throughout the breeding season.

Download the report here.

Abortion in Cattle, Glenn Rogers with American Association of Bovine Practitioners, Postpartum Interval, Top 6 Influences of Postpartum Anestrus, Brandon Depenbusch with CattleTrace, BCI Beef Tip

Welcome to Episode 46 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with two guests; American Association of Bovine Practitioners President, Glenn Rogers, and Vice President of Cattle Operations for Innovative Livestock Services, Brandon Depenbusch. Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:07 – Abortion in Cattle

8:00 – American Association of Bovine Practitioners President – Glenn Rogers

13:25 – Postpartum Interval

17:32 – Top 6 Things Influencing Postpartum Anestrus

  • Age
  • BCS at Calving
  • Change in BCS from Calving to Breeding
  • Julian Date at Calving
  • Nutritional Availability
  • Dystocia/Retained Placenta

19:27 – Vice President of Cattle Operations for Innovative Livestock Services and Chairman of CattleTrace – Brandon Depenbusch

25:20 – BCI Beef Tip: Keep Records and/or Samples to Go Back To

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Introduction of Guest Jackie McClaskey, American Royal, Opportunities in Agriculture, Getting Youth Involved in Agriculture, In the News

Welcome to Episode 45 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with former Kansas Secretary of Agriculture, Jackie McClaskey. Jackie is now the President of the Future American Royal Campus.  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 – Introduction of Jackie McClaskey – President of the Future American Royal Campus – Former Kansas Secretary of Agriculture

4:09 – American Royal

9:05 – Opportunities in Agriculture

14:03 – BCI CattleChat Checklist – Top 6 Opportunities in Agriculture

  • Value Added Opportunities
  • Increased Efficiency
  • Opportunity to those Supplying and Servicing New Technology
  • Diversification
  • Increased Access to Information
  • Attracting Young People to Agriculture

15:30 – Getting youth Involved in Agriculture

21:54 – In the News

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Vet Call: Anaplasmosis

By Dr. Bob Larson, DVM, professor of production medicine
Reprinted with permission from the Angus Journal.

Anaplasmosis is a serious disease that affects cattle in an increasing larger area of the country. A tiny organism called Anaplasma marginale attaches to red blood cells which leads to destruction of those cells and a decrease in the ability of affected cattle to carry oxygen in their blood. If more red blood cells are destroyed than the animal can replace with new cells the blood becomes watery, the animal becomes anemic, and other signs of infection can occur including yellow discoloration of the mucus membranes, fever, depression, dehydration and rapid or difficult breathing. Sometimes affected animals become excited and aggressive when not enough oxygen reaches the brain. Young animals are often able to recover because they can make new red blood cells very quickly, but older animals do not produce new cells very fast and they can quickly become very anemic and have very low oxygen levels in the blood leading to severe illness or death.

Anaplasmosis is primarily transferred between cattle by ticks, but the movement of blood from infected cattle to susceptible cattle can also be accomplished by biting flies such as horseflies, or by human activities such as via blood-contaminated needles, dehorning instruments, tattoo pliers or palpation sleeves. The disease has historically been a problem in the southern parts of the United States but has now spread north so that cattlemen in many important beef-producing areas need to be aware of the problem. In herds that become exposed to the organism, cattle of any age can become infected, but the severity of illness is usually mild in young cattle and increases with age. In cattle that become infected when they are 3 years of age or older, 30% to 50% of animals showing signs of the disease are likely to die. If infected cattle are able to survive they are not likely to have severe problems due to the disease in the future, but they remain as carriers for the rest of their life. In some cases these carrier infections can be eliminated using antibiotic treatment.

The first sign of anaplasmosis in a herd may be the sudden death of adult cattle. If anaplasmosis is identified as a cause of death and disease in a herd, cattle that are obviously sick should be kept as quite as possible and treated with a blood transfusion to replace red blood cells and/or with an injectable tetracycline antibiotic to kill the organism. In addition, healthy animals should be moved away from the affected cattle to reduce the risk of the organism being transferred to the rest of the herd by ticks or biting insects, and low levels of tetracycline can be fed in the mineral mix or supplement to provide additional protection to the herd.

For carrier cattle that don’t appear sick but that are infected with the anaplasma organism, your veterinarian can plan a treatment protocol using tetracycline antibiotics administered over several days to clear the organism. However treatment with tetracycline is not effective for all cattle and those animals that are cleared of the organism become susceptible to re-infection.

The best plan to minimize disease lose due to anaplasmosis depends greatly on a farm’s or ranch’s geographic location and the number of cattle in the area that are infected. In parts of the country where anaplasmosis infection is rare, a strategy to find and treat and/or remove any carrier-animals is recommended. In contrast, in areas of the country where many cattle are infected, an attempt to remove all carriers from a herd will result in a herd that is susceptible to re-infection and the herd may have greater losses than if other strategies had been used to minimize the disease’s effects.

If infected cattle are found in a herd in a part of the country where anaplasmosis is rare, one strategy to minimize disease loss is to test the herd for anaplasmosis infection and to treat any test-positive animals with tetracycline as directed by your veterinarian. This treatment should be at a time of year when the local tick and fly population is the lowest. Because the treatment does not clear infection from every animal, the animals should be tested again about six months after the tetracycline treatment and if a positive is found at this time, it should be considered a treatment-failure and removed from the herd, either by slaughter or by being sold to a herd in an area where anaplasmosis is common.

In contrast, in herds located where anaplasmosis is common, rather than trying to avoid infection, some producers may want to allow infection to occur while the cattle are young in order to minimize obvious sickness and death loss. In some countries young animals are purposefully exposed to the organism allowing them to build immunity at a time in their life when the disease is mild. Although they will be infected for life, they are not likely to suffer severe illness. In some states in the U.S., your veterinarian may be able to obtain an experimental anaplasmosis vaccine that does not prevent infection, but is reported to reduce the risk of clinical signs and death. Producers may also elect to feed low levels of chlortetracycline when the disease is most prevalent to control active infection and use insecticides to control tick and fly populations.

Because the best anaplasmosis control strategy for a particular farm or ranch depends on how likely that herd is to come into to contact with the organism, an important component of a control strategy is a plan to deal with replacement animals. If your herd is free of anaplasmosis and the risk of exposure is low, any replacement animal should be tested before being brought into contact with the herd. A test-positive animal should either be culled or isolated and treated with tetracycline and then re-tested six months after treatment. In contrast, if your herd is infected with anaplasmosis and the organism is common in your area, a test-positive replacement animal is desired, and the greatest health risk is in replacement animals that are not infected with the organism but that will be placed in direct contact with carrier animals. In this situation, one option is purposeful exposure (or vaccination if available) with close monitoring for clinical signs of the disease and quick treatment if disease is detected.

Anaplasmosis control requires a good working relationship with your veterinarian to determine your level of risk and best control strategies. The best control strategy for your herd may be very different from that of your neighbors or cattlemen in other parts of the country.

Dr. Bob Larson is a professor of production medicine with the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University, Edgar E. and Elizabeth Coleman Chair of Food Animal Production Medicine, executive director of Veterinary Medical Continuing Education, and faculty member with the Beef Cattle Institute. He specializes in the integration of animal health, production efficiency and economic considerations in beef cattle production. This column is reprinted and redistributed with permission from the Angus Journal.

K-State Animal Science Cattlemen’s Day Event, Annual Legacy Sale, Bull Buying Season, 8 Tips to Prepare for a Bull Sale, Lice in Cattle, Supplementing Cows

Welcome to Episode 44 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 – 106th Annual Cattlemen’s Day Event and Annual Legacy Sale

5:40 – Bull Buying Season

14:29 – BCI Cattle Chat Checklist – 8 Tips to Prepare for a Bull Sale

  • Pre-Sale Preparation
  • Identify what Breed you Need
  • Make a Long List
  • Know Your Price Restraints
  • Use Selection Indexes
  • Know what Your Operation Needs
  • Show Up Early and Shorten Your List
  • Get to Know Your Bull Provider

15:36 – Lice in Cattle

17:38 – Supplementing Cows

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

BCI collaborates with K-State’s housing and dining, animal science, others to celebrate Kansas Day

Beef was for dinner on Tuesday, Jan. 29 for every on-campus student at K-State’s Derby, Van Zile and Kramer dining halls. To celebrate Kansas’s 158th birthday, the BCI partnered with K-State’s Department of Housing and Dining Services; Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and the department’s Collegiate Cattlemen and Meat Science Association; and the Kansas Beef Council, to bring burgers and other Kansas-sourced foods to plates across campus. The night fostered promotion of beef in college dining centers and discussion of beef-related perceptions.

Kansas-sourced beef burgers twice the size of the dining halls’ standard menu drew students from across campus residence halls to wait in 20-minute lines.

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Students waited an average of 20 minutes to enjoy the double-sized burgers served at K-State’s Derby, Kramer and Van Zile dining halls on Kansas Day.

The event, spurred by the Beef Cattle Institute’s (BCI) Director of Value Chain Alliances Patti Dollarhide, collaborated with Dr. Kelly Whitehair, instructor with the college’s Department of Human Ecology, to raise students’ awareness of beef.

The menu featured beef burgers from K-State’s Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, buns from Flowers Baking Company in Lenexa, macaroni and cheese made with sorghum from Nu Life Market in Scott City, chili verde made with pork from the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, rolls made with flour from Grain Craft Mills in McPherson, and birthday cake and K-State’s own Call Hall ice cream.

Students attending the dining halls that evening were greeted with a large image of a cow projected on-screen, and members of the university’s Collegiate Cattlemen’s club and meat science program, who helped answer student questions.

Both Dollarhide and Dr. Whitehair agree the double-sized burgers were a huge hit, but Dr. Whitehair believes the students understanding the products were made in Kansas made an impact.

“Beef is important to sustaining our Kansas economy,” says Dollarhide. “I wanted to feature this healthy, delicious protein in conjunction with our talented K-State dining services team, which has a reputation for serving great food. It was important to have representatives from the Department of Animal Science’s Collegiate Cattlemen and the Meat Science Association available to  answer questions for those unfamiliar with modern agriculture. Telling the story of Kansas beef here in our dorms proved to be one more way we can be transparent about our industry and help people feel good about enjoying beef in their diets. The dining staff executed the meal perfectly, and the long burger lines proved there was no difficulty getting students to celebrate Kansas beef.”

Plans are in the works to hold the event again next year, as well as for more beef education events throughout the year.

Patti Dollarhide is a registered dietitian and the director of beef value chain alliances at Kansas State University’s Beef Cattle Institute. Learn more about her here

Listen to a clip from the Kansas Livestock Association here.