Meet Myriah Johnson, Stump the Expert, Sustainability Impact on You, Tips for Managing Sustainability on Your Operation, Current Sustainability Research Focus

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

2:30 Meet Myriah Johnson

4:30 Stump the Expert

15:30 Sustainability Impact on You

23:50 Tips for Managing Sustainability on Your Operation

25:00 Current Sustainability Research Focus

NCBA
USDA ERS

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Stump the Expert, Direct Beef Marketing, Top Considerations for Direct Marketing Beef, Pinkeye, Pulling Bulls from the Breeding Pasture

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6:15 Stump the Expert

12:40 Direct Beef Marketing

19:20 Top Considerations for Direct Marketing Beef

20:25 Pinkeye

26:00 Pulling Bulls from the Breeding Pasture

Beef Improvement Federation Conference

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Gabby’s Questions, Water Consumption, Top Water Management Considerations for Summer, Fly Control, Hay Management

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3:10 Gabby’s Questions

11:06 Water Consumption

17:10 Top Water Management Considerations for Summer

17:45 Fly Control

23:05 Hay Storage

AgManager

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!Audio Player

Mitigating Ruminant Methane Emissions

Last month we evaluated data indicating that only 35% of current methane emissions from domestic ruminants is contributing to increased atmospheric methane. With reductions in methane emissions ranging from 10 to 50%, feed additives could almost eliminate the 35% contributing to atmospheric methane.  Many feed additives have potential adverse effects on the animal, but 3-nitrooxyproponal reduces methane emissions without negatively affecting animal performance and is in the process of commercialization. Furthermore, 3-nitrooxypropanol shifts rumen VFA profile toward higher proportions of propionate making the ruminant animal more feed efficient and the compound very attractive to economically include in livestock rations.

Dustin Questions, Listener Question, Legume Bloat, Top Ways to Prevent and Manage Legume Bloat, Price Risk Management

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

2:30 Dustin Questions

9:50 Listener Question

16:35 Legume Bloat

23:50 Top Ways to Prevent and Manage Legume Bloat

24:40 Price Risk Management

Dr. J’s Beef
AgManager
Beef Basis
KSU Beef

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Meet Jeanette Thurston, Dustin Questions, New Consumer Behaviors, Top Post-Pandemic Consumer Behaviors, Food Security

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4:20 Meet Jeanette Thurston

6:25 Dustin Questions

16:30 New Consumer Behaviors

23:00 Top Post-Pandemic Consumer Behaviors

24:00 Food Security

Something to Chew On

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Role of your veterinarian in your business

Bob L. Larson, DVM, PhD
Beef Cattle Institute
Kansas State University

There are many people that impact the success of your ranching business, including your customers, your lenders, and your suppliers. One of the important suppliers for cow-calf producers is the local veterinarian. Veterinarians can provide important advice and service to improve ranch income, decrease costs, provide protection from losses due to disease, and offer options for marketing high-health cattle.

Ranch income is primarily derived from the sale of calves either at weaning for commercial operations or as breeding bulls or heifers for seedstock producers. Commercial ranchers can increase their income by increasing the pounds of calves at weaning and seedstock operations the number of marketable breeding animals from the same land and cow resources by increasing the reproductive efficiency of the herd. Veterinarians can provide advice and services to monitor and evaluate heifers, cows, and bulls so that a high percentage of the herd is able to successfully mate at the start of each breeding season.

Nutrition has an important impact on whether or not growing bulls and heifers reach puberty at an appropriate age and your veterinarian may be able to provide you with appropriate diets to meet targeted weight gain goals. Genetics also strongly influences whether developing bulls and heifers reach puberty by target ages, and your veterinarian is a valuable resource when considering selection and culling decisions. By doing breeding soundness examinations of bulls and heifers near yearling age, your veterinarian can help you identify the individuals that reach puberty at the time and with the amount of feed resources that you have identified to meet your ranch goals.

Doing breeding soundness examinations of mature bulls prior to the start of each breeding season allows your veterinarian to remove bulls that may fail during the breeding season due to foot or leg problems, other health problems, or reproductive tract problems. Although the reproductive tracts of mature cows are not routinely evaluated before the start of each breeding season, managing and monitoring the cows to confirm that a high percentage of the cows calve early enough in the calving season and in good enough body condition to resume fertile cycles by the start of the breeding season helps to ensure that herd reproductive efficiency will be high.

Monitoring body condition scores of the cow herd and rainfall amounts as predictors of future forage production potential allows your veterinarian to provide advice on a changing year-by-year basis to alter stocking density, timing of weaning, and supplementation strategies to ensure that cows enter the calving and breeding seasons in good body condition. The land base and herd size dictate much of the cost-side of cow-calf production and making sure that a high percentage of the cow herd becomes pregnant early in the breeding season allows those costs to be spread over a large number of marketable calves. By using body condition scores collected at several key points in the production cycle, your veterinarian can help you fine-tune the management of your herd based on the ranch forage-base, and the availability of cost-effective supplements or grazing alternatives, and the optimum cow size and milking ability for your herd. 

While every production year is expected to generate income from the sale of calves and to incur expenses associated with pasture and supplementation costs as well as cow depreciation and bull costs, significant losses due to disease is expected to be a rare event for cattle operations. Losses that are expected to occur rarely if at all but that could have a devastating impact on the financial status of a ranch if they did occur must be managed with cost-effective risk management strategies. Because disease losses do not occur every year, providing no defense may appear to be a sufficient and very low-cost management strategy in the short-run. However, over a longer time-frame, it would be very unusual for a herd with minimal disease protection to avoid devastating financial losses due to disease at some point in the future. Your veterinarian can provide valuable information about the likelihood that your herd could suffer losses from various diseases and the expected magnitude of those losses should your herd be exposed. By considering the likelihood of a disease, the magnitude of losses associated with that disease, and the effectiveness of available control strategies, your veterinarian can work with you to optimize the disease risk management of your ranching business.

Marketing of cattle, whether feeder calves or breeding animals, increasingly includes information about health status. When considering the optimum herd health program from a marketing standpoint, the risks that down-stream buyers face and their willingness to purchase from suppliers who can reduce that risk must be considered. For example, your herd may have very low risk for a disease and incurring expenses through diagnostic testing or herd certification may not reduce your herd’s already minimal risk; but the costs could easily be offset by customers willing to pay for that low disease risk. Increasingly, you must think of your down-stream customers as you work with your veterinarian to plan a health program that not only meets the needs of your herd but also provides a cost-effective marketing advantage.

A successful cattle business requires a combination of cattle and business expertise. Many successful ranchers count on a trusted team of advisors and suppliers to help them improve the profitability and sustainability of their ranching business. Finding and working with a local veterinarian who can provide assistance to increase income, control costs, and manage risks should be a goal of every cattle producer.

Student’s Perspective on COVID, Meet Dr. Matthew Kelso, VTPRK Program, FAVC Program

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

1:50 Student’s Perspective on COVID

7:40 Meet Dr. Matthew Kelso

10:30 VTPRK Program

17:45 FAVC Program

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Vaccine Handling Quiz, In Season BSE, Top Items to Check In Season for Successful Breeding, Predicting/Monitoring Weather, In the News

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

2:30 Vaccine Handling Quiz

12:10 In Season BSE

18:10 Top Items to Check In Season for Successful Breeding

19:15 Predicting/Monitoring Weather

23:50 In the News

CattleTrace: Callahan Grund – cgrund@uscattletrace.org

Beef Improvement Federation

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Reassessing Ruminant Methane Contribution

The environmental impact of livestock production, especially ruminants, has received a lot of attention in both the scientific community and popular media. One of the most discussed aspects of ruminants’ environmental impact is the production of the greenhouse gas, methane. Methane is produced as a natural byproduct of fermentation in the ruminant stomach during the process of feed digestion. The production of methane is not a man-made process and occurs naturally in all wild and domestic ruminant animals.

Wild ruminants in North America include deer, moose, elk, big horn sheep, antelope and bison with bison having the largest population. Estimates of the bison population prior to European settlement of North America varies greatly ranging from 21 to 88 million. And estimates of the total wild ruminant population prior to settlement ranges from 83 to 133 million. Due to lots of factors chief among them the growth in human population, the wild ruminant population has decreased to 30.5 million today and have been replaced by 90 million domestic ruminants.

Do domestic ruminants produce more methane than wild ruminants? Methane emissions factors for bison are similar to that of domestic cattle when fed the same diet, and both are greater than deer and elk. However, diets of wild and domestic ruminants are not necessarily similar. Diets of domestic ruminants are managed by humans and are typically of greater nutritive value than wild ruminants consume, especially during the winter months when vegetation is dormant.

Attempting to account for differences in methane emissions from wild and domestic ruminants, recent research compared the amount of methane from wild ruminants prior to European settlement of North America and current wild and domestic ruminant populations (Figure 1). Due to the wide variation in estimates of bison population, results were computed for low, medium and high bison populations. Based on these data, the amount of methane from domestic ruminants contributing to the increase in global atmospheric methane concentration is less than 100% because a fraction of that methane is replacing naturally produced methane from pre-settlement wild ruminant populations. Doing the math, the proportion of methane emissions from domestic ruminants in North America that is contributing to atmospheric methane concentrations ranges from 50 to -19% depending upon the pre-settlement bison population with an average of 35%.

Several feed additives have been investigated for their ability to reduce enteric methane emissions from domestic ruminants; the most effective include methane inhibitors, electron acceptors, hydrogen sinks, and plant extracts. These feed additives can reduce enteric methane emissions from 10 to 50% depending upon domestic ruminant species and diet, indicating that implementation could mitigate the 35% of domestic ruminant methane emissions that is new to North America since the European settlement. Although most of these feed additives have adverse effects that may hinder their use, one, 3-nitrooxyproponal, reduces methane emissions without negatively affecting animal performance and is in the process of commercialization. 3-nitrooxypropanol also shifts rumen VFA profile toward higher proportions of propionate making the ruminant animal more feed efficient, which is very similar to another feed additive, monensin, which has been widely adopted in ruminant livestock production. Thus, the use of 3-nitrooxypropanol looks very attractive for producers to economically include in livestock rations and could significantly mitigate enteric methane emissions from domestic ruminants.

In conclusion, the extent of domestic ruminants’ contribution to greenhouse gas emissions is not as great as once thought, although livestock production has more environmental impact than methane alone. It appears that we are on the verge of balancing the methane scale as far as domestic ruminant emissions are concerned.

Estimated methane emissions from wild ruminants prior to European settlement of North American Continent based on 3 estimates of the American bison herd (30, 50 and 75 million bison) compared with methane emissions from current population of wild and domestic ruminants. Adapted from Hristov, 2012

Dustin Questions, Supply Chain Disruption, Spring Processing of Calves, Top Considerations for Processing Calves, Listener Questions

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

3:30 Dustin Questions

8:30 Supply Chain Disruption

17:00 Spring Processing of Calves

22:40 Top Considerations for Processing Calves

23:10 Listener Question

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Calving Timing, Optimizing Cow Size, Tips for Determining Optimum Cow Size in Your Operation, Burning Management, Listener Question

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1:30 Calving Timing

11:00 Optimizing Cow Size

19:19 Tips for Determining Optimum Cow Size in Your Operation

20:17 Burning Management

26:05 Listener Question

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Record Keeping

Bob L. Larson, DVM, PhD
Beef Cattle Institute
Kansas State University

Because cow-calf operations characteristically have high operating costs and deal with fluctuating input and sale prices, ranches typically operate within a narrow profit margin. However, there are great differences between ranches in their overall profitability as defined by the difference between prices received and operating costs. In order to maintain a profitable ranching operation, producers must continually look to improve herd efficiency through increasing the value of animals sold and/or decreasing the cost of production. The use of records is essential to identify sources of inefficient production so that management changes can be implemented, and then to track the effects of management decisions on production efficiency. In addition, the trend toward “identity preservation”, and “process verification” has led to new opportunities for those producers that can document production practices as well as growth efficiency and carcass quality after cattle leave the ranch.

Veterinarians who work with beef cattle producers often desire records to assist in the assessment of production efficiency, to help in the investigation of disease outbreaks, and as a component of Beef Quality Assurance (BQA). Different veterinarians have preferences for different types of records and record-keeping systems, but all would agree that having accurate information about the herd has many valuable uses.

Systems for gathering data for records are numerous and varied. These systems can collect data on either the whole herd or on individual animals. The simplest form of record gathering is head counts for the purpose of keeping accurate inventories. The next level of record gathering is whole herd data that includes percent calf crop, percent pregnant, average sale (weaning) weights, etc. and this type of record gathering is adequate to get a picture of overall herd performance. The next level of record keeping involves individual animal performance records which provide the best information for identifying problems and possible solutions, however, this type of system requires a greater commitment in time and expense.

From a record-keeping standpoint, the needs of cow-calf ranches differ from other livestock operations such as dairies, feedlots, and swine or poultry operations in that cow-calf ranches only collect usable information at a few specific times of the year such as at preg-check, weaning, pasture turn-out, or at times that specific ranches handle their cattle. This is in contrast to other livestock production systems that hand-deliver feed on a daily basis, measure production on a daily (dairy) or at least weekly or monthly (swine or poultry) basis due to frequent marketing, and tend to have more animals so that treatment for disease is a frequent activity of herd management. Because of these differences, the relatively low amount and frequency of data collection in cow-calf herds allows ranchers to have very effective record keeping systems that are simpler than systems needed by other livestock production systems. In fact, a lot of important information can be captured on the ear tag or freeze brand (year of birth, sire breed, calving order – i.e. calved early or late in calving season) and paper or relatively simple computer programs can be used to keep and organize ranch production and health records. It is important to gather all the information that you will need to make decisions, but it is not necessary to set up record-keeping systems that collect information that is not used.

One area of record keeping that is valuable for cow-calf ranches and their veterinarians is information to measure reproductive efficiency. The information that is needed to identify opportunities for enhanced reproductive efficiency and to help diagnose reproductive inefficiency includes: accurate estimates of when cows become pregnant, cow characteristics such as age and breed, and breeding group information such as which bulls were in the breeding pasture, characteristics of the breeding bulls such as age and breed, the length of the breeding season, and a record of any events such as bull injury that occurred during the breeding season. Veterinarians can use this information to create graphs that show how many cows become pregnant each 21-day period of the breeding season, and can determine if specific ages, breeds, or breeding groups are not as reproductively efficient as the rest of the herd.

When veterinarians investigate disease outbreaks, information about which cattle got sick or died (age of cattle affected), what behavior the rancher saw that caused concern, the date an animal was first identified as sick or died, and which pasture or lot the sick animals were housed in prior to being identified can all be used to look for patterns in age, location, dam age, or other characteristics that help identify the events that led up to the disease problem. Any information about individual sick cattle or outbreaks of disease should be kept for several years so that if a similar problem reoccurs, accurate information is available.

Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) involves several aspects of cattle management that directly affect the quality of the beef products sold to consumers as well as the health and welfare of the herd. Accurate documentation of all events that occur to an animal from the time of birth, through all of the production phases and on into the slaughter house is becoming the expected level of record-keeping.  Whenever a vaccine, dewormer, fly control, antibiotic or other product is administered to cattle, you should record the exact name of the product, the serial number of the product you purchased, the dose that was administered, and how the cattle were treated (i.e. by mouth, in the muscle, under the skin, etc.).

If you are considering a change in your record keeping system, it is important to develop a system that collects all the information that you need to make the management decisions that you are targeting; but in the simplest manner than accomplishes your goal. The output of any record keeping system should allow you to easily and accurately see the overall productivity of your herd as well as to use individual performance data to make management changes that improve overall efficiency.

Pre-harvest Pathogen Control, Future Trends in Food Safety, Top Future Trends in Food Safety, Listener Question

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3:40 Pre-harvest Pathogen Control

12:15 Future Trends in Food Safety

24:00 Top Future Trends in Food Safety

25:00 Listener Question

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Heifer CONSULT, Getting Cows Bred Early, Tips for Getting Cows Bred Early, Sync Protocols, Listener Question

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2:15 Heifer CONSULT

9:35 Getting Cows Bred Early

14:40 Tips for Getting Cows Bred Early

15:30 Sync Protocols

20:00 Listener Question

Estrus Sync Planner
Sync Protocols
Applied Reproductive Strategies
Clean-Up Bulls

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Sustainability. Food Waste. COVID-19. College Closed.

One of our veterinarians asked how Kansas State University handled the sudden COVID-19 disruptions in their food service operations. “Did they waste much food? Was it donated or destroyed?”

We know all too well what goes into producing high quality, safe, nutritious beef and how satisfying it is to watch customers enjoy our product. The flip side is how disappointing it is to learn that research tells us that 18% of beef is wasted after it gets to the customer. In case other cattle producers are curious about how our university handled their food inventory when the volumes suddenly decreased, I spoke with Mary Molt, the associate director of housing and dining services.

“So Mary, how much food went to waste when KSU closed the dining halls?” Her reply, “Not much.”

She went on to say, “I am proud of our staff, and the food production and service system that has been honed for so many years. Having a central food stores for both frozen and dry stores was a lifesaver. Because of our staff, system and facilities we minimized waste to very little.”

KSU Housing and Dining is not the typical college food service provider. They use standardized recipes and cook mostly from scratch. They recently expanded their dry, refrigerated and frozen warehouse to have more flexibility to purchase food in season as well as carry an inventory for emergencies. They have longstanding relationships with supply chain partners, including our own on-campus Weber and Call Halls, and all of their unit managers are registered dietitians with a strong food management backgrounds. This may seem a bit old-fashioned as others have gone to “just in time” deliveries and eliminated expensive refrigeration and freezer storage. Others build their menu around many processed foods and manufacturer-prepared meats, with less use of commodities. Often their managers are trained outside of institutional settings. 

The K-State book “Food for Fifty”, published first in 1937 and still published today is a gold standard for quantity food production. You see, Mary Molt is the current author and her team knows how to rework leftovers, handle food safely, and minimize waste. They froze the fluid milk to use later in recipes such as mashed potatoes and sauces. They froze cheese, meat and bread. They immediately stopped the produce orders and worked seamlessly with John Wolf in Weber Hall to cut production. With still a few students living on campus, much of the remaining food was incorporated into recipes and served. The small amount of perishable products not able to be used was donated. There was only a small loss from products that had to be discarded. 

At the Beef Cattle Institute, we enjoy a great partnership with KSU Housing and Dining as we work together to help educate other college and hospital food service buyers about modern beef production.  Our common goal is to create more sustainable food systems based on science and research.   

Sustainable food service?  NAILED IT.

Mary Molt, Kansas State University Associate Director of Housing and Dining services has been a strong supporter of registered dietitians and their value to organizations. She is the past recipient of many prestigious industry awards including the Academy’s Medallion Award in 2013.
Kramer Dining Center is one of three student dining areas and contains nearly 60,000 square feet of state-of-the-art kitchen, serving, dining and retail space.

Take Care of those Cattle for Me

Do you ever wonder if the return merits the time and expense spent doing farm tours and education sessions for non-agriculture friends in the foodservice? We drive thru our operations and talk about how and why we do what we do, but do the participants give thought about us the next time they make a decision about menu planning and purchasing?

I’m here to tell you that they do. Last October, BCI faculty and staff hosted 11 non-commercial foodservice professionals in Kansas as part of our education efforts. The tour jointly sponsored with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association focused on modern production methods and how they relate to questions their customers in healthcare and college and universities have about sustainability including environmental concerns, animal health practices and who is producing their beef.

One of those participants was Ryan Conklin, an executive chef with REX Healthcare, in Raleigh, North Carolina. I recently had a conversation with Ryan about how he and his business are managing the restrictions placed on them by the COVID-19 crisis. He shared that life is tough right now. He and his culinary and nutrition team are feeding the patients and workers. They even converted an unused public dining space to allow busy hospital workers to take home things they need for their families.  Staple items such as ground beef, milk, and yes, toilet paper, are able to be purchased.  At the end of the conversation, Ryan said, “Take care of those cattle for me.”

Another participant, Bill Marks with Hennepin County Healthcare in the heart of Minneapolis, Minnesota has also been coping with the virus. He also shared that his recent days at a large community hospital in inner-city Minneapolis are the most challenging he has ever experienced.   “People are scared to come to work.  Free meals are the norm, so the kitchen workers have more people to feed than ever.  You never know for sure what will, or will not be, on the delivery truck but we are figuring it out as we go,” said Bill.    

As he reflected on his time attending the workshop, Bill shared, “It was one of the best education events I’ve attended in my 35 years in foodservice.”

We can put names with faces as we see people in the trenches on national news finding ways to serve their hospitals and universities during these challenging times.  Agriculture benefits from these exchanges as we learn how to best support our customers and provide confidence in their food supply.

And don’t worry Ryan, you can rest assured in knowing our beef producers and veterinarians are taking care of those cattle for you.

KSU Beef Cattle Sustainability Fall Tour 2019 foodservice operators enjoying the Fink Genetics herd.

Beef Prices Up, Cattle Prices Down, Grazing Management and Pasture Turnout, Top Recommendations for Transitioning Cows to Grass, Grass Tetany

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

5:30 Beef Prices Up, Cattle Prices Down

10:20 Grazing Management and Pasture Turnout

19:53 Top Recommendations for Transitioning Cows to Grass

20:40 Grass Tetany

Webinars & Meetings:
AgManager
BIF

Grazing Management Resources:
Kansas Grazing Lands Coalition
Stocking Rate Calculations
Rangeland and Pasture Management
Stock Water Development
Watering Systems
Forages

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Dustin Questions, Disease Response/Traceability in the Age of COVID 19, Incoming Bull Management Biosecurity, Tips for Bringing New Bulls Into Your Operation, Listener Question

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

3:00 Dustin Questions

9:00 Disease Response/Traceability in the Age of COVID 19

15:30 Incoming Bull Management Biosecurity

21:00 Tips for Bringing New Bulls Into Your Operation

21:46 Listener Question

Guide to Body Condition Scoring Beef Cows and Bulls
Bull Transition Ration

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

COVID Responses, KLA Update, Managing a Business During a Crisis, Tips for Managing a Business In a Crisis, Opportunities Post Crisis

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

4:00 COVID Responses

9:45 Kansas Livestock Association Update

12:50 Managing a Business During a Crisis

20:30 Tips for Managing a Business In a Crisis

21:45 Opportunities Post Crisis

Resources:
Cattleman’s College
AABP
Webinars

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Contracted tendons in calves, Separate replacements from herd, Accounting for depreciation in a budget, Dwarfism in young calves, Gestation length and calf size, Calving timing and production efficiency, Biggest changes in beef industry, Keys to cow-calf profitability, Favorite part of the podcast

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

2:00 Contracted tendons in calves

4:08 Separate replacements from herd

10:10 Accounting for depreciation in a budget

12:40 Dwarfism in young calves

17:40 Gestation length and calf size

22:20 Calving timing and production efficiency

30:30 Biggest changes in the beef industry

42:10 Favorite part of the podcast

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Generational Perceptions about Meat

Baby Boomers have different perceptions about buying meat than younger generations.  Based on a recent white paper, Generational Shifts, boomers believe that meat should be “kept on hand”. 

Since 2017, U.S. consumers spend more money in foodservice establishments such as restaurants, schools and gas stations than in retail grocery stores.  Choices about what to eat are expanding into animal production methods as we balance our diets and develop sustainable food systems.  A lot of discussion is spent defining what a healthy diet looks like, and where our food comes from. Information can be overwhelming as we read labels, and decipher how one product differs from another as we vote with our dollars to choose products that fit into personal value systems.

This week we have seen empty meat cases in the grocery stores as people are stocking up for coronavirus quarantines.  Will we reflect for generations to come, like the Great Depression, on how this pandemic changed us?

My Dad told colorful stories of life on the farm during the Depression.  Most of the stories always seemed to have a happy ending, as families and neighbors took care of each other and did what they could to make the best of what they had.  “We always felt sorry for the people living in big cities,” my Dad would say, “because they didn’t have enough to eat.”  Dad’s family didn’t have money or lights or indoor bathrooms like people who lived in town, but they raised most of their own food — eggs, chickens, milk and beef, vegetables from the garden, and fruit from the orchard. 

It’s 2020 and we see grocery store meat counters emptied as people scramble to stock up and hunker down for numerous days of quarantine.  Less than 2% of us are now connected with agriculture as opposed to 40% in the 1930’s.  Today the U.S. has plenty of food available, but an empty meat case as a result of consumers stocking up for more stay-at-home meals is something we have never seen.

Consumers are making choices about what to have on hand, and purchasing priorities are being tested.  Typical patterns of consumption are shifting and social distancing recommendations are forcing change like never imagined.   What will become the new norms?

  • Will we cook more meals at home?  Good way to control ingredients and portion sizes
  • Will we keep more staples on hand for emergencies?   Buy when on sale for best price; convenient
  • Will we be more aware of food waste?    Leftovers become plan-overs
  • Will we remember that beef is a compact, nutritional powerhouse with minimal calories?    Better for me
  • Will this bring our generations to a deeper understanding of risk and give us new lenses to understand how to best build a more sustainable and prosperous food supply?

People will always need to eat.  I wonder what kind of stories we will pass along to the next generation….

Biosecurity & Risk Management, Beef Demand Index, Listener Question, Getting Bulls Ready for Breeding, Top Tips for Preparing Bulls for Breeding

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

2:15 Biosecurity & Risk Management

7:45 Beef Demand Index

10:30 Listener Question

19:07 Getting Bulls Ready for Breeding

25:10 Top Tips for Preparing Bulls for Breeding

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

Dustin’s Travels, Cow-Calf Profitability, Calf Death Loss, Top Ways to Manage Death Loss in Your Herd, Protein Supplementation, Listener Question

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

1:50 Dustin’s Travels

6:20 Cow-Calf Profitability

12:32 Calf Death Loss

17:50 Top Ways to Manage Death Loss in Your Herd

18:21 Protein Supplementation

22:10 Listener Question

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!

When to Calve, Deciding to Treat, Top 4 Criteria for Deciding When to Treat, Genetics and Health

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on any links below to be taken to sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news regarding the podcast on Facebook and Twitter.

3:50 When to Calve

11:00 Deciding to Treat

15:02 Top 4 Criteria for Deciding When to Treat

15:42 Genetics and Health

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating!Audio Player