Dr. Ellis, HR Risk, Transition/Estate Plans, Top 5 Areas of Risk & How to Manage, Crisis Communication, Communication Strategies, Fall Brown Calves & Weaning Tips

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 Dr. Ellis, Ag Communications Department Head

4:12 HR Risk

11:24 Transition/Estate Plans

12:58 Top 5 Areas of Risk & How to Manage

14:35 Crisis Communication

18:30 Communication Strategies

21:20 Fall Born Calves & Weaning Tips

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Keep/Cull Poll Question, Livestock Risk Protection, Dr. Larson’s Tanzania Trip, Ag Econ Questions, Institutional Risk, Young Calf Health, Top 5 Health Concerns with Pre-Weaned Calves, Soil Spores, Foot Rot

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 Keep/Cull Poll Question

2:20 Livestock Risk Production

3:40 Dr. Larson’s Tanzania Trip

6:40 Ag Economics Questions

11:00 Institutional Risk

14:45 Young Calf Health

17:30 Top 5 Health Concerns with Pre-Weaned Calves

18:45 Soil Spores

22:20 Foot Rot

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Dr. Dodd, Breeding Season To-do, Moving Calving Season, 7 Tips to Consider when Moving Calving Season, Financial Risk

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:50 Dr. Dodd and Senior Veterinary Students

9:05 Breeding Season To-do

14:35 Moving Calving Season

19:48 7 Tips to Consider when Moving Calving Season

22:00 Financial Risk

26:40 Announcements

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Ag Economics Question, Listener Question, Top 9 Tips for Bringing in Replacements to Manage Health Risks, Production Risk, What to do with a Cow that has Lost a Calf and Kansas Mesonet Cattle Comfort Index

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

3:38 Agricultural Economics Questions

6:20 Listener Question

12:30 Top 9 Tips for Bringing in Replacements to Manage Health Risks

15:00 Production Risk

20:52 What to do with a Cow that has Lost a Calf

27:00 Kansas Mesonet Cattle Comfort Index

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Face and Horn Flies, Risk Management, What to Do After Turning Bulls Out

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:38 – Face and Horn Flies

12:03 – Risk Management

21:10 – What to Do After Turning Bulls Out

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Veterinary Training Program for Rural Kansas Scholars, Cow/Calf Profitability, Kansas Extension Master Food Volunteers, In the News

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:15 – Veterinary Training Program for Rural Kansas Scholars

5:28 – Cow/Calf Profitability

9:05 – Kansas Extension Master Food Volunteers

13:58 – In the News

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Kansas Farm Management Association Report, Thin Cows at Breeding Time, Dealing with Injured Forage Base, Interview with Patti Dollarhide, Ear Tagging, Top 6 Things to Know About Anaplasmosis, Upcoming Events

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:45 – Kansas Farm Management Association Report

9:40 – Thin Cows at Breeding Time

13:05 – Dealing with Injured Forage Base

16:50 – Patti Dollarhide’s Trip to US Roundtable

21:00 – Listener Question – Ear Tagging

24:40 – Top 6 things to Know about Anaplasmosis

  • You can transfer Anaplasmosis Mechanically
  • Biological Vectors
  • Need a VFD to feed tetracycline
  • Anaplasmosis is a Long-term Infection
  • Identify sick cows early
  • Handle sick cows gently

26:32 – Upcoming Events

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Guest Introduction, Spring Lameness in Cattle, Top 5 Tips for Managing Feet and Legs in Bulls, Working Spring Calves, Should I Implant my Cows?

Welcome to Episode 54 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with Senior in Veterinary Medicine, Ellie Minnix!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:42 – Introduction of Ellie Minnix

6:25 – Spring Lameness in Cattle

13:05 – Top 5 Tips for Managing Feet and Legs in Bulls

  • It’s a bigger problem than you realize
  • Not everything is foot-rot
  • Check them through breeding season
  • Evaluate genetic components
  • Evaluate well before the breeding season

15:00 – Working Spring Calves – Do we have to use the same injection site?

18:15 – Should I Implant My Cows?

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Top 10 Ways to Improve Grilling this Season, Introduction of Special Guest Sharla Huseman – Kansas Beef Council, Common Questions for Sharla, Ag Census Facts, Kansas Beef Council and BCI Collaborate on Events , Actions to Take as a Producer

Welcome to Episode 53 of BCI Cattle Chat which is sponsored by the Kansas Beef Council! Our special guest on this episode is Sharla Huseman, Director of Marketing for the Kansas Beef Council. Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

3:10 – BCI CattleChat Checklist – Top 10 Ways to Improve This Year’s Grilling Season

  • Wireless Thermometers
  • Choose Grilling Cuts – For Information on Correct Meat Cuts, visit https://www.kansasbeef.org/
  • Know Your Seasonings
  • Try New Things
  • Share With Others
  • Plan Time Appropriately
  • Be Patient with Charcoal
  • Let Meat Rest
  • Embrace the Process
  • Match Cooking Device

6:05 – Introduction of Sharla Huseman – Director of Marketing for the Kansas Beef Council

10:30 – Common Questions for Sharla

12:49 – Facts from Ag Census

18:55 – Kansas Beef Council and BCI Collaborate on Events

26:35 – What Actions Can I Take to Make a Difference as a Producer?

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Special Episode – Quiz Bowl with K-State Animal Science Champion Quadrathlon Team Vs. BCI CattleChat Podcast Team

Welcome to BCI CattleChat! If you enjoy testing your knowledge on animal health, listen to this episode to hear a special quiz bowl hosting the K-State Animal Science Champion Quadrathlon Team Vs. the BCI CattleChat Podcast Team. There are questions from all categories, try to answer the questions before the buzzer goes off and see which team will win it all!

A huge thank you to the ASI Champion Quadrathlon Team for participating in this fun episode. The Champion team consists of; Derek Neal, Senior in Animal Science, Kyndall Norris, Junior in Animal Science, Amanda Roth, Senior in Animal Science, Mark Jameson, Senior in Animal Science and Karol Fike, Professor in Animal Science.

Questions from Ag Census, Pre-Season Bull Training, Top 6 Things to do for Pre-Season Bull Management, Grass Tetany

Welcome to BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

5:00 – Questions from Ag Census

9:42 – Pre-season Bull TrainingExtension

18:29 – Top 6 Things to do for Pre-Season Bull Management

  • Acclamate Bulls
  • Check Feet and Legs
  • Parasite Control
  • Preventative Health
  • Body Condition
  • Breeding Soundness Exam

19:42 – Grass Tetany

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Travels of the Podcast Team, Top Strengths of the U.S. Industry, AI Synchronization in Heifers, Stage 2 & 3 Labor

Welcome to Episode 50 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:35 – Travels of the Podcast Team

10:20 – Top 9 Strengths of the U.S. Industry

  • Extension
  • Veterinary Training and Diagnostic Labs
  • Productivity and Land Fertility
  • Efficiency and Knowledge
  • Investment in Research
  • Infrastructure Investment (Roads, Railroads, Rivers, Etc.)
  • Education
  • Data Availability
  • People and Producers in Agriculture

13:18 – AI Synchronization in Heifers

18:54 – Stage 2 & 3 Labor

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Guest Tony Batterham, Herd Expansion, Colostrum Management, Top 5 Tips for Managing Colostrum in Beef Herds, Antimicrobial Use in Feed yards, Animal Activism

Welcome to Episode 49 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with Tony Batterham, DVM and Feed yard Consultant of Australia.  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:58 – Introduction of Tony Batterham – DVM, Feed yard Consultant and Board Member of ALFA (Australian Lot Feeders’ Association)

5:26 – Herd Expansion

8:12 – Colostrum Management

14:51 – Top 5 Tips for Managing Colostrum in Beef Herds

  • Manage Body Condition Score
  • Suitable Calving Environment
  • Calving Difficulty Management
  • Feed Colostrum to those with Dystocia
  • Have a Well Vaccinated Cow Herd

16:12 – Antimicrobial Use in Feed yards

20:15 – Animal Activism

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Travels of Podcast Team, Is AI Worth It?, Top 10 Tips for a Successful AI Synchronization Program, Cull Cows, In the News

Welcome to Episode 48 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

:49 – Travels of the Podcast Team

8:39 – Is AI Worth It?

16:48 – Top 10 Tips for a Successful AI Synchronization Program

  • You don’t have to synchronize all cows
  • Have cycling cows
  • Use only high accuracy Bulls
  • Make sure heifers are heavy enough to breed, and cows have a good BCS
  • Make sure the cows you are going to synchronize are far enough from calving season post-partum
  • Use a synchronization protocol that fits your management
  • Make sure facilities are adequate
  • Double check your protocol
  • Have equipment and supplies on hand
  • Have a strategy to identify early calving cows

18:40 – Cull Cows

23:02 – In the News

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Calving Records, Interview with Justin Waggoner – Beef Systems Specialist

Welcome to Episode 47 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with Justin Waggoner, Beef Systems Specialist in Garden City, Kansas. Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:38 – Calving Records

4:05 – Interview with Justin Waggoner – Beef Systems Specialist

Please see below for the supplementation diagram mentioned in the podcast.

Source: Mathis CP, Sawyer JE. Nutritional management of grazing beef cows. Vet Clin N Amer 23:1-19, 2007.

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Using the Pregnancy Analytics Mobile App: Bull problems and BSEs

The Beef Cattle Institute’s Dr. Bob Larson brings you a series of “cases” employing the use of the Pregnancy Analytics mobile app. Each case will explore a unique herd and examine its reproductive efficiency, strengths, challenges and areas of improvement. The reports (linked below) will lead you through using the Pregnancy Analytics app to utilize the data and practice using it on an actual problem herd.

The case: Bull problems and BSEs

A herd of 209 commercial red-composite cows was palpated on October 7. The herd is split into three breeding pastures with bulls being turned out on June 10 and removed on August 15. The calves were being weaned on the ranch (i.e. left in their current pastures) and the cows were being trucked to a new pasture so the owner started dropping off cows at your clinic very early in the morning to be preg-checked, dewormed, and vaccinated before being taken to fall grazing on corn stalks. During the breeding season: 62 were in the “West Pasture” with two bulls, 81 were in the “North Pasture” with three bulls, and 66 were in the “Windmill Pasture” with two bulls. About 60% of the first-calf heifers were in the West Pasture –– with the rest split between the other two pastures.

Findings

Seventy-six cows were open (64% were pregnant) and only 8% of the cows were classified as being “thin” (BCS <5).

The first analysis of the preg-check data was to look at the percent of the herd that became pregnant each 21-day period of the breeding season and we find that 44.5% of the herd became pregnant in the first 21-days (pregnancies would have been 98 to 119 days), 13.9% in the second 21-day period (77-97 days), and 5.3% in the third 21-day period (56-76 days). The goal for this herd (and most herds) is to have at least 60% of the cows becoming pregnant in the first 21 days of breeding.

Another way to evaluate preg-check data is to determine the percent of the available (non-pregnant) cattle that become pregnant each 21-day period. Recognize that as the breeding season goes along, once cattle become pregnant, they are no longer available to get pregnant again, so the percent of the herd that becomes pregnant each 21 days is not the same as the percent of available cattle that become pregnant each 21 days. To display this measure of reproductive success using the Pregnancy Analytics App – select “% Preg Success”. Based on expected pregnancy success when both cow and bull fertility is optimum, the “% Preg Success” goal should be between 60%-70% for every 21-day period of the breeding season.

Looking at the percentage of open cows that became pregnant each 21-day period, we find that either cow or bull fertility (or both) was lower than desired at the start of the breeding season (44.5% settling in first 21 days) and pregnancy success did not improve and in fact got worse as the breeding season progressed (25% in the second 21 days and 12.6% in the third 21 days).

In this herd, the poor over-all percentage pregnant clearly indicates a problem and the percent pregnant by 21-day interval provides information that the poor reproductive performance continued for the entire breeding season. To begin to evaluate the herd further, the Pregnancy Analytics App provides a way to easily divide the herd into pertinent sub-groups – and when the pregnancy success by 21-days is evaluated by age group, we find that both the first-calf heifers and the mature cows had too many open cows. (1st-calf heifers are defined as those cows suckling their first calf and being bred for their second pregnancy).

More information can be found by displaying the % Preg Success and while neither the 1st-calf heifers nor the cows reached the expected reproductive performance of 60-70% of open cows becoming pregnant in a 21-day period –– the 1st calf heifers tended to perform better than cows and the performance declined over the breeding season.

The preg-check data can also be evaluated by comparing the breed-up differences between body condition score categories. We know that only 8% of the herd was classified as “thin” at the time of preg-check, so we may be justified to ignore any assessment of the association between BCS and pregnancy distribution in this herd; but to be complete, I looked at BCS and found that cows classified as being in moderate body condition performed as poorly as cows classified as being thin.

So far, the information I have looked at raises the possibility of either Trichomoniasis or bull problems being the most likely rule-outs – with cow infertility due to nutritional or late-calving being less likely because the magnitude of open cows is more compatible with bull problems or Trich and the fact that fertility does not improve as the cows have more time post-partum to resume fertile cycles as the breeding season progresses.

The most revealing information about this herd is obtained by looking at the effect of breeding pasture on reproductive performance (both the pregnancy distribution and % Preg Success).

I interpret this information as evidence that the primary problem for this herd is in the Windmill pasture. The other two pastures (West and North) perform very well early in the breeding season – indicating that the cows must have had time post-partum and adequate nutrition pre- and post-partum to resume fertile cycles by the 21st day of the breeding season. Nearly all the open cows were in the Windmill pasture and fertility was very poor throughout the breeding season. The magnitude of the infertility is worse than I would expect for Trichomoniasis and definitely worse than I would expect with a cow problem (in addition, excellent cow performance in the other pastures pretty much rules out a cow problem). The poor reproductive performance in the Windmill pasture must be due to a bull problem.

Conclusion

The primary problem in this herd is in the Windmill pasture and almost has to be due to a bull problem even though the rancher reports that all the bulls were between three and five years of age and had been successful breeders in previous years. I would recommend a BSE on both bulls from this pasture, but if one or both bulls pass the BSE, my diagnosis would not change (finding a musculoskeletal or semen problem in one or both bulls would confirm the diagnosis).

To prevent this problem in the future, I would strongly recommend a BSE for all bulls before the start of breeding and frequent assessment of bull musculoskeletal health and amount of estrus activity throughout the breeding season.

Download the report here.

Abortion in Cattle, Glenn Rogers with American Association of Bovine Practitioners, Postpartum Interval, Top 6 Influences of Postpartum Anestrus, Brandon Depenbusch with CattleTrace, BCI Beef Tip

Welcome to Episode 46 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with two guests; American Association of Bovine Practitioners President, Glenn Rogers, and Vice President of Cattle Operations for Innovative Livestock Services, Brandon Depenbusch. Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:07 – Abortion in Cattle

8:00 – American Association of Bovine Practitioners President – Glenn Rogers

13:25 – Postpartum Interval

17:32 – Top 6 Things Influencing Postpartum Anestrus

  • Age
  • BCS at Calving
  • Change in BCS from Calving to Breeding
  • Julian Date at Calving
  • Nutritional Availability
  • Dystocia/Retained Placenta

19:27 – Vice President of Cattle Operations for Innovative Livestock Services and Chairman of CattleTrace – Brandon Depenbusch

25:20 – BCI Beef Tip: Keep Records and/or Samples to Go Back To

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Introduction of Guest Jackie McClaskey, American Royal, Opportunities in Agriculture, Getting Youth Involved in Agriculture, In the News

Welcome to Episode 45 of BCI Cattle Chat where we had the opportunity to visit with former Kansas Secretary of Agriculture, Jackie McClaskey. Jackie is now the President of the Future American Royal Campus.  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 – Introduction of Jackie McClaskey – President of the Future American Royal Campus – Former Kansas Secretary of Agriculture

4:09 – American Royal

9:05 – Opportunities in Agriculture

14:03 – BCI CattleChat Checklist – Top 6 Opportunities in Agriculture

  • Value Added Opportunities
  • Increased Efficiency
  • Opportunity to those Supplying and Servicing New Technology
  • Diversification
  • Increased Access to Information
  • Attracting Young People to Agriculture

15:30 – Getting youth Involved in Agriculture

21:54 – In the News

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Vet Call: Anaplasmosis

By Dr. Bob Larson, DVM, professor of production medicine
Reprinted with permission from the Angus Journal.

Anaplasmosis is a serious disease that affects cattle in an increasing larger area of the country. A tiny organism called Anaplasma marginale attaches to red blood cells which leads to destruction of those cells and a decrease in the ability of affected cattle to carry oxygen in their blood. If more red blood cells are destroyed than the animal can replace with new cells the blood becomes watery, the animal becomes anemic, and other signs of infection can occur including yellow discoloration of the mucus membranes, fever, depression, dehydration and rapid or difficult breathing. Sometimes affected animals become excited and aggressive when not enough oxygen reaches the brain. Young animals are often able to recover because they can make new red blood cells very quickly, but older animals do not produce new cells very fast and they can quickly become very anemic and have very low oxygen levels in the blood leading to severe illness or death.

Anaplasmosis is primarily transferred between cattle by ticks, but the movement of blood from infected cattle to susceptible cattle can also be accomplished by biting flies such as horseflies, or by human activities such as via blood-contaminated needles, dehorning instruments, tattoo pliers or palpation sleeves. The disease has historically been a problem in the southern parts of the United States but has now spread north so that cattlemen in many important beef-producing areas need to be aware of the problem. In herds that become exposed to the organism, cattle of any age can become infected, but the severity of illness is usually mild in young cattle and increases with age. In cattle that become infected when they are 3 years of age or older, 30% to 50% of animals showing signs of the disease are likely to die. If infected cattle are able to survive they are not likely to have severe problems due to the disease in the future, but they remain as carriers for the rest of their life. In some cases these carrier infections can be eliminated using antibiotic treatment.

The first sign of anaplasmosis in a herd may be the sudden death of adult cattle. If anaplasmosis is identified as a cause of death and disease in a herd, cattle that are obviously sick should be kept as quite as possible and treated with a blood transfusion to replace red blood cells and/or with an injectable tetracycline antibiotic to kill the organism. In addition, healthy animals should be moved away from the affected cattle to reduce the risk of the organism being transferred to the rest of the herd by ticks or biting insects, and low levels of tetracycline can be fed in the mineral mix or supplement to provide additional protection to the herd.

For carrier cattle that don’t appear sick but that are infected with the anaplasma organism, your veterinarian can plan a treatment protocol using tetracycline antibiotics administered over several days to clear the organism. However treatment with tetracycline is not effective for all cattle and those animals that are cleared of the organism become susceptible to re-infection.

The best plan to minimize disease lose due to anaplasmosis depends greatly on a farm’s or ranch’s geographic location and the number of cattle in the area that are infected. In parts of the country where anaplasmosis infection is rare, a strategy to find and treat and/or remove any carrier-animals is recommended. In contrast, in areas of the country where many cattle are infected, an attempt to remove all carriers from a herd will result in a herd that is susceptible to re-infection and the herd may have greater losses than if other strategies had been used to minimize the disease’s effects.

If infected cattle are found in a herd in a part of the country where anaplasmosis is rare, one strategy to minimize disease loss is to test the herd for anaplasmosis infection and to treat any test-positive animals with tetracycline as directed by your veterinarian. This treatment should be at a time of year when the local tick and fly population is the lowest. Because the treatment does not clear infection from every animal, the animals should be tested again about six months after the tetracycline treatment and if a positive is found at this time, it should be considered a treatment-failure and removed from the herd, either by slaughter or by being sold to a herd in an area where anaplasmosis is common.

In contrast, in herds located where anaplasmosis is common, rather than trying to avoid infection, some producers may want to allow infection to occur while the cattle are young in order to minimize obvious sickness and death loss. In some countries young animals are purposefully exposed to the organism allowing them to build immunity at a time in their life when the disease is mild. Although they will be infected for life, they are not likely to suffer severe illness. In some states in the U.S., your veterinarian may be able to obtain an experimental anaplasmosis vaccine that does not prevent infection, but is reported to reduce the risk of clinical signs and death. Producers may also elect to feed low levels of chlortetracycline when the disease is most prevalent to control active infection and use insecticides to control tick and fly populations.

Because the best anaplasmosis control strategy for a particular farm or ranch depends on how likely that herd is to come into to contact with the organism, an important component of a control strategy is a plan to deal with replacement animals. If your herd is free of anaplasmosis and the risk of exposure is low, any replacement animal should be tested before being brought into contact with the herd. A test-positive animal should either be culled or isolated and treated with tetracycline and then re-tested six months after treatment. In contrast, if your herd is infected with anaplasmosis and the organism is common in your area, a test-positive replacement animal is desired, and the greatest health risk is in replacement animals that are not infected with the organism but that will be placed in direct contact with carrier animals. In this situation, one option is purposeful exposure (or vaccination if available) with close monitoring for clinical signs of the disease and quick treatment if disease is detected.

Anaplasmosis control requires a good working relationship with your veterinarian to determine your level of risk and best control strategies. The best control strategy for your herd may be very different from that of your neighbors or cattlemen in other parts of the country.

Dr. Bob Larson is a professor of production medicine with the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University, Edgar E. and Elizabeth Coleman Chair of Food Animal Production Medicine, executive director of Veterinary Medical Continuing Education, and faculty member with the Beef Cattle Institute. He specializes in the integration of animal health, production efficiency and economic considerations in beef cattle production. This column is reprinted and redistributed with permission from the Angus Journal.

K-State Animal Science Cattlemen’s Day Event, Annual Legacy Sale, Bull Buying Season, 8 Tips to Prepare for a Bull Sale, Lice in Cattle, Supplementing Cows

Welcome to Episode 44 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

1:00 – 106th Annual Cattlemen’s Day Event and Annual Legacy Sale

5:40 – Bull Buying Season

14:29 – BCI Cattle Chat Checklist – 8 Tips to Prepare for a Bull Sale

  • Pre-Sale Preparation
  • Identify what Breed you Need
  • Make a Long List
  • Know Your Price Restraints
  • Use Selection Indexes
  • Know what Your Operation Needs
  • Show Up Early and Shorten Your List
  • Get to Know Your Bull Provider

15:36 – Lice in Cattle

17:38 – Supplementing Cows

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

BCI collaborates with K-State’s housing and dining, animal science, others to celebrate Kansas Day

Beef was for dinner on Tuesday, Jan. 29 for every on-campus student at K-State’s Derby, Van Zile and Kramer dining halls. To celebrate Kansas’s 158th birthday, the BCI partnered with K-State’s Department of Housing and Dining Services; Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and the department’s Collegiate Cattlemen and Meat Science Association; and the Kansas Beef Council, to bring burgers and other Kansas-sourced foods to plates across campus. The night fostered promotion of beef in college dining centers and discussion of beef-related perceptions.

Kansas-sourced beef burgers twice the size of the dining halls’ standard menu drew students from across campus residence halls to wait in 20-minute lines.

Unknown
Students waited an average of 20 minutes to enjoy the double-sized burgers served at K-State’s Derby, Kramer and Van Zile dining halls on Kansas Day.

The event, spurred by the Beef Cattle Institute’s (BCI) Director of Value Chain Alliances Patti Dollarhide, collaborated with Dr. Kelly Whitehair, instructor with the college’s Department of Human Ecology, to raise students’ awareness of beef.

The menu featured beef burgers from K-State’s Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, buns from Flowers Baking Company in Lenexa, macaroni and cheese made with sorghum from Nu Life Market in Scott City, chili verde made with pork from the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, rolls made with flour from Grain Craft Mills in McPherson, and birthday cake and K-State’s own Call Hall ice cream.

Students attending the dining halls that evening were greeted with a large image of a cow projected on-screen, and members of the university’s Collegiate Cattlemen’s club and meat science program, who helped answer student questions.

Both Dollarhide and Dr. Whitehair agree the double-sized burgers were a huge hit, but Dr. Whitehair believes the students understanding the products were made in Kansas made an impact.

“Beef is important to sustaining our Kansas economy,” says Dollarhide. “I wanted to feature this healthy, delicious protein in conjunction with our talented K-State dining services team, which has a reputation for serving great food. It was important to have representatives from the Department of Animal Science’s Collegiate Cattlemen and the Meat Science Association available to  answer questions for those unfamiliar with modern agriculture. Telling the story of Kansas beef here in our dorms proved to be one more way we can be transparent about our industry and help people feel good about enjoying beef in their diets. The dining staff executed the meal perfectly, and the long burger lines proved there was no difficulty getting students to celebrate Kansas beef.”

Plans are in the works to hold the event again next year, as well as for more beef education events throughout the year.

Patti Dollarhide is a registered dietitian and the director of beef value chain alliances at Kansas State University’s Beef Cattle Institute. Learn more about her here

Listen to a clip from the Kansas Livestock Association here.

How Big of a Concern is Mud, Sandhills Calving System, Top 5 Tips for Managing and Preventing Calf Scours, When Should I Castrate Bull Calves, Beef Up Your Kansas Day Event

Welcome to Episode 43 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:16 – How Big of a Concern is Mud?

6:58 – Sandhills Calving System

12:45 – Top 5 Tips for Managing and Preventing Calf Scours

  • Identify sick calves as soon as possible
  • Make sure that cows calve in adequate body condition
  • Make sure that cows don’t congregate in one area of the pasture
  • Separate older calves from younger calves
  • Make every week like the first week of the calving season for as many cows as possible

For a more detailed report of these tips, please click here

14:16 – When Should I Castrate Bull Calves?

17:40 – Interview with Patti Dollarhide – Beef Up Your Kansas Day Event

23:15 – BCI Beef Tip – Take Mud Seriously

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Top 5 ways to prevent and manage calf scours

By Dr. Bob Larson, professor of production medicine

5. Identify sick calves as soon as possible so that you can remove them from contact with other calves and to treat them appropriately with fluids as directed by your veterinarian.

4. Make sure that cows calve in adequate body condition (Body Condition Score of 5 or 6) to ensure that each cow has a sufficient quantity of good quality colostrum.

3. Make sure that cows don’t congregate in one area of the pasture and create an extremely muddy environment for calves. Even if placed in a large pasture, cows will congregate near the feed and water and calves won’t spend time in the parts of the pasture that are clean. As much as possible, separate water sources and feed source and move bale rings frequently or unroll hay in a different part of the calving or nursery pasture each day so that cows and their calves spend time in the cleanest parts of the pasture.

2. Separate older calves from younger calves. Calves are at greatest risk for scours during the first three weeks of life and become fairly resistant by six to eight weeks of age. Even though older calves are not as likely to become sick with scours, they still shed a lot of the germs that cause scours and are a major source of germs to the susceptible young calves. Using several nursery pastures so that each pasture only contains calves of similar age greatly decreases the risk of calf scours.

1. Make every week like the first week of the calving season for as many cows as possible. The Sandhills Calving System recommends that enough calving pastures are available so that once a week all of the cows that calved that week are left in the pasture with their calves and all the cows that have not calved yet are moved to a new, clean pasture. In this system, calves born every week of the calving season are protected from exposed to older calves and are born on clean ground. Although starting new calving pastures each week is ideal, if you don’t have enough pastures to implement the full Sandhills System, starting new calving pastures by moving pregnant cows away from cow-calf pairs every two, or three, or even every four weeks will result in as many calves being born in the first week of their calving pasture as possible.

Types of Risk, Top 7 Risks You May Want to Plan For, In the News

Welcome to Episode 42 of BCI Cattle Chat!  Please click on the links below to be taken to any sources mentioned in the podcast. Keep an eye out for news about our exciting upcoming guests on both Twitter and Facebook.

2:10 – Risk

  • Production Risk
  • Price Risk
  • Legal/Regulatory Risk
  • HR Risk
  • How Do You Respond?

Source : K-State Center for Risk Management Education and Research

13:20 – Top 7 Risks That You Should Have a Plan For

  • Calf-Death Loss
  • Open cows
  • Drought
  • Price-Risk
  • Transition Plan
  • Human Resources Risk
  • Financial Risk

15:32 – In the News

BCI Beef Tip – Helping a Newborn Calf Breathe

For more on BCI Cattle Chat, follow us on Twitter @The_BCI, and check out our new website, ksubci.org. If you have any comments/questions/topic ideas, please send them to bci@ksu.edu. Don’t forget if you enjoy the show, please go give us a rating in iTunes or Google Play.

Vet Call: Cold-weather concerns

By Dr. Bob Larson, DVM, professor of production medicine
Reprinted with permission from the Angus Journal.

A high percentage of the U.S. beef herd resides in areas of the country where moderately to extremely cold winter temperatures are common. By planning for winter weather, ranchers can avoid being caught off-guard by extreme events and can manage the typical winter conditions so cattle do not have to continually utilize body fat as an energy source to keep warm, leading to excessive loss of body condition.

Situations that are most likely to cause cold stress are: Cattle with thin fat cover and short hair coats (due to movement from a warmer environment to a colder environment, or extremely cold temperatures early in the fall/winter season); cattle with wet hides, or high wind speed accompanying cold temperatures. Wind chill is a better predictor of cold stress than temperature alone because cold wind draws heat away more quickly than still air at the same temperature. Wet or mud-caked hair losses its ability to insulate the animal and a wet winter hair coat only provides as much protection from the cold as a typical summer hair coat. If cold wind is combined with a wet hair coat (as can occur during a winter storm), the effects can be very profound.

Adult cattle with a dry hair coat, adequate body condition, and abundant, adequate-quality forage can withstand most winter situations, especially if they have the ability to find protection from wind and have been exposed to moderately cold conditions for several weeks which allows them to acclimate by growing a thick winter hair coat and increasing feed intake. As temperatures drop, cattle increase heat production which means the number of calories they need for maintenance increases. This increase is met by consuming more feed and moving it through the digestive tract faster, but the cost of this faster movement is that feed is not digested as fully. The effect of needing increased calories for maintenance at the same time that feed digestibility is decreasing means that if cows do not have access to plenty of digestible feed, they will have to “burn” body fat as a calorie source.

Another factor that can limit feed intake in winter conditions is if water sources are frozen or unavailable. If feed intake cannot keep up with energy demands, and body fat is mobilized to meet energy demands, then the cows will have less fat insulation and will be more susceptible to cold temperatures, causing a viscous cycle that can lead to cold stress and even more weight loss.

Cold weather brings a special concern with bulls because of the potential to have frostbite damage to the scrotum and testicles. It is very important that bulls have protection from the wind and adequate bedding if they are housed on concrete or dirt.

Cold temperatures have the greatest potential to cause serious problems in young calves, particularly calves in the first day of life. Because calves are born wet, have thin skin and very little body fat, they lose body heat very rapidly and if they are not able to become dry, can quickly become severely cold stressed. Contact with snow or wet ground will increase the amount of time that a calf stays wet and in danger. Body temperature of newborn calves can drop to dangerously low levels in 3 hours or less.
Calves are born with a body temperature of about 100˚F. When exposed to a cold environment, calves are able to produce heat in two ways: shivering and the heat production of brown fat (fat that surrounds the kidneys of a new-born), and they can conserve heat by reducing blood flow to the body surface and extremities (feet, ears, etc.). In early stages of cold exposure, calves will shiver vigorously and have a fast heart rate and breathing rate. If that does not keep the body temperature up, the calf’s body sends less blood to feet, ears and nose in an effort to minimize heat loss. Severe cold stress occurs when the body temperature drops below 94˚F. At this temperature, the brain and other organs are affected and the calf becomes depressed, unable to rise, unwilling to suckle, and will temporarily lose the ability to shiver. The good news is that if the calf can be warmed up and its body temperature can begin to rise, the shivering response will return and the core body temperature will slowly increase.

During periods of cold or wet weather, newborn calves (less than 1 to 2 days of age) should be checked every few hours with a thermometer and any calf with a below-normal temperature, even if it appears OK, should be warmed. Calves suffering from cold stress must be warmed so that body temperature can rise above 100˚F. If body temperature has not dropped too far, putting the calf in the cab of a pickup out of the wind and rain or snow will warm the calf. In more severe cases the calves can be placed in warm water, specially designed warming boxes, or near a heat source such as an electric blanket, heat lamp, or hot water bottles. To avoid skin burns, the heat source should not exceed 108˚F. In addition to an external heat source, cold-stressed calves should be fed warm colostrum, milk, or electrolyte fluid with an energy source using an esophageal feeder.

Prevention of cold stress involves management to ensure that calves can be born in a short period of time and both the calf and dam can stand shortly after calving so that they can bond and the calf can begin suckling. Anything that prolongs calving or reduces the chance that a calf will suckle soon after birth should be addressed by management changes. Calving difficulties are minimized by proper heifer development, proper bull selection for calving ease, and proper nutrition so that heifers and cows calve in a body condition score of 5 to 6 on a 9-point scale. Cows with large teats or that are not attentive mothers should be culled.

Use of pasture as the primary forage source during calving encourages cows to keep spread apart and minimizes development of muddy areas. If the herd forage plan includes feeding hay, consider feeding hay in early to mid-gestation and saving stockpiled pasture for the calving season. If supplemental hay and grain are fed during calving, these should be provided at locations that are separate and distant from water sources and windbreaks. I discourage the use of bale rings in calving and nursery pastures and suggest that if using large round bales, they be unrolled and the feeding area changed with each feeding. Unrolled bales will have greater hay waste, but reduced chance for mud caused by concentrating the herd into small feeding areas, and unrolled hay provides bedding for newborn calves so that they are not in direct contact with the ground.

In addition to monitoring the weather forecast for severe winter weather events and to be alerted to times when additional feed is needed, minimizing the effects of cold temperatures on newborn calves involves planning ahead and considering calf comfort and protection when making heifer development, bull selection, nutrition and pasture-management decisions. Making sure that cows will have adequate access to forage and water even in situations with significant snow cover is necessary to provide sufficient calories to maintain body fat and heat production. Protecting the cow herd (and bulls) from winter wind and providing bedding if on concrete or mud/dirt will minimize the effects of severe weather.

Dr. Bob Larson is a professor of production medicine with the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University, Edgar E. and Elizabeth Coleman Chair of Food Animal Production Medicine, executive director of Veterinary Medical Continuing Education, and faculty member with the Beef Cattle Institute. He specializes in the integration of animal health, production efficiency and economic considerations in beef cattle production. This column is reprinted and redistributed with permission from the Angus Journal.